Savor The Earth

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Texas Velvet Biscuit Cake March 28, 2010

Filed under: biscuits,bread,breakfast,cake,easy,locavore,vegetarian — Austin Frugal Foodie @ 10:00 pm

honey me this

Back to baking!  With the reintroduction of beans into our diet after last week’s brush with death (well that’s what it felt like, anyways), and it being Sunday and coolish, I decided that biscuits were in order.  And honey.

This super easy recipe combines local Richardson Farms fresh ground whole wheat flour with a softer flour from King Arthur for a fluffy and super-light texture that soaks up a hive of honey.  So comb your cupboards and nectar nooks for the bee sap to enjoy this mound melligenously.  Yeah, that’s right.  I made up an adverb.

TEXAS VELVET BISCUIT CAKE makes a 9″ round of 6 (sort of) large biscuits

Combine the dry ingredients in your food processor and whirl until mixed.  Add the butter and lard and process until the mixture looks mealy.  You’re not going for flaky here so do blend the fat in well.  Turn the flour out into a bowl and stir in the yogurt with a fork until well blended.  Using a greased ½-cup measure or spring-loaded scoop (best), scoop out six heaping ½-cup portions and place them in a buttered 9″ round pan (1½” to 2″ high).  You’ll get five biscuits around the perimeter and one in the middle.

Bake at 425° for 20 to 25 minutes, until the biscuits are golden brown and well-risen.  Let the biscuits cool in the pan on a rack for 10 minutes before turning them out.  Use a fork to pull the biscuits apart (they’ll have coalesced) and split them for honeyin’.

Bzzzzzzzzzzzz!

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Gingerbread

Filed under: cake,easy,locavore — Austin Frugal Foodie @ 9:12 pm

nice hat, lady

Spring cleaning, interrupted.  Not much accomplished around the house last week—I definitely fell behind in my efforts to clear out last year’s (last decade’s!) old food.  When my appetite recovered, the first treat I wanted to enjoy-up was that opened pint of Organic Valley heavy cream.  So I baked some gingerbread as an excuse to rest under a dollop.  Read into that what you will, but this here unrefined cake comes out just coarse enough to luxuriate in a slumming slap of whoop cream (Forgive me.  I’ve been out of commission.)  Lightly sweetened with a bit of turbinado and aromatized with Maker’s Mark-based homemade vanilla extract, my chantilly made a dainty lady out of a wholesome dessert.

TEXAS ENOUGH GINGERBREAD makes one 11″ X 7″ panful

  • 2½ ounces (5 Tablespoons) organic butter, softened.  I love Organic ValleyClick for a coupon.
  • ½ teaspoon salt.  I use Real Salt.
  • 1 heaping Tablespoon grated fresh domestic organic ginger root (don’t bother to peel it), or 1½ teaspoons ground dried ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • fresh zest of a Texas lemon or orange, optional
  • 1/3 cup local honey.  Good Flow‘s my standard brand.  We can enjoy so many yummy hunnys in Central Texas!
  • 2/3 cup cane syrup.  Fain’s or Steen’s.  Or you can use molasses.
  • 1 local egg
  • 242 grams Richardson Farms whole wheat flour, most of the bran sifted out
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda, sieved
  • ¾ cup local milk.  I like goat milk from Swede Farm Dairy or Wateroak Farm.

Cream the butter, salt, fresh ginger, ground spices and zest, if using .  Beat in the egg.  Beat in the honey and syrup.  Combine the flour and baking soda and mix into the batter in two additions alternately with the milk, beginning and ending with the flour.  Pour the batter into a greased and floured 11″ X 7″ pan (old-fashioned brownie pan size) and bake at 350° for 30 to 35 minutes, until the cake tests done.

I like to serve gingerbread warm with whoop cream, but the spices get to know each other, given some time, and the cake tastes even better the next day.